find your nearest mediation service

click here to view a full list
 

SEARCH FAQs

Divorce
Separation
Mediation
MIAM
Money
Parents / Parenting
Child / Teens
Grandparents

You may be eligible for legal aid if you are on a low income or not working, including if your financial circumstances have changed because of Covid19. We can help you start the assessment process before you book an appointment.

Call our mediation team on 0300 400 0636, or email mediation@nfm.org.uk

If you are ready to book an appointment you can go straight to our online booking page.

Legal aid is available for family mediation cases that help families agree arrangements where:

  • You’re getting divorced and therefore need to sort out financial arrangements
  • Child arrangements have broken down, and so you are not seeing your children
  • Any dispute following family breakdown that may end up in court.

You can find more information on our legal aid pages here

Legal Aid is provided by the government to cover the cost of family mediation services for families in dispute.

It is means-tested. So you have to provide evidence of your current financial circumstances to prove you’re entitled to receive it. 

If you are eligible, Legal Aid will cover all your individual mediation costs. It will also cover costs of the initial appointment and first mediation meeting for the other person, if they’re not eligible in their own right. 

Eligibility for Legal Aid also enables you to get legal aid for legal costs, up to a cost limit.

At your initial family mediation appointment (the MIAM) you can ask about legal aid for mediation.

They mediator will discuss what issues need resolving. Some family mediation cases are eligible for Legal Aid. But others are not. Examples of cases the Legal Aid Agency would consider eligible are: 

  • You are getting divorced and need to sort out money.
  • Child arrangements have broken down and you are not seeing your children.
  • Any dispute following family breakdown that may end up in court.

Family mediation is much quicker, less stressful and usually cheaper than heading to court.

It helps you make long-term settlements on parenting, money and property.

It enables you to keep control of your destiny, instead of handing it over to a court.

It’s an active process, so the decisions are made by the participants, not by a judge.

To begin family mediation, the first step is to attend a Mediation Information and Assessment Meeting (MIAM).

This gives you an opportunity to find out what family mediation is about. And it helps you find out if it is suitable for you and your circumstances.

It also lets you consider the issues you will need discuss to achieve divorce or separation before you take part in family mediation. 

Book an appointment

If you and the mediator decide to continue with mediation, you will both organise a further meeting. The mediator will make sure you know what you need to do to achieve a legal separation. The mediator will also help you to gather the information, facilitate the discussions and help you develop options and solutions. 

Mediators cannot give advice or act as a lawyer for either party.  

Mediation is both confidential and “privileged”. 

This means you are free to exchange information and ideas without the constraints of fearing these ideas may be used against you at a later date. 

Because both people are working with the same base of information, it takes far less time to negotiate a resolution that makes sense to you both of them. 

Once you have decided to go ahead with family mediation, contact us.

Then we will quickly begin arranging an appointment for you with one of our expert family mediators.  

NFM runs a network of local family mediators working in hundreds of locations right across England and Wales. 

The two people involved do not have to attend the same MIAM. Instead they can attend this meeting in their own locality. 

If full mediation goes ahead our national network will help you agree a location for future sessions. 

If either person decides against mediation, or if mediation breaks down, you or your ex may want make an application to court. Unless there is a valid exemption to mediation, it is a legal requirement that an accredited family mediator signs the appropriate court form/s as evidence that you have considered mediation.

Click here to book an appointment to see an expert mediator

Still can't find what you're looking for?
0300 4000 636